The OHS Pipe Organ Database

St. Thomas the Apostle R.C. Church
14816 Route B
St. Thomas, Missouri 65076

OHS Database ID 1360.

See the address on Google Maps.


Status and Condition

The organ has been renovated and is no longer in its original state.
The organ is in good condition and in regular use.
We received the most recent update on this organ's state and condition December 21, 2018.


Technical Details

Slider chests. Mechanical key action. Mechanical stop action.

One manual. 2 divisions. 9 stops. 9 registers. 9 ranks. 477 pipes. Manual compass is 58 notes. Pedal compass is 25 notes.

The organ is in a gallery-level case at the rear of the room. Traditional style console with a keyboard cover that can be lifted to form a music rack. The organ has an attached keydesk.

Drawknobs in horizontal rows on terraced/stepped jambs. No enclosed divisions. Combination Action: Fixed mechanical system. Flat straight pedalboard.

Notes

  • All original Pfeffer pipe work is extant, even as ~30 Pfeffer pipes are currently intermixed with three ranks of pipes located on electric offset chests (from 1983) located behind the Pfeffer case and wired to a 1950's-era 2 manual Wicks console located downstairs. (OHS PC Database. October 30, 2004)
  • (OHS PC Database. October 30, 2004)
  • Updated through online information from Fr. Jeremy Secrist. (Database Manager. September 1, 2015)
  • Updated through online information from Fr. Jeremy Secrist.
    The Pfeffer instrument at St. Thomas the Apostle was restored according to OHS guidelines by Quimby Pipe Organs of Warrensburg, MO, with restoration completed in July 2016. (Database Manager. August 23, 2016)
  • Updated by James R. Stettner, listing this web site as a source of information: https://pipeorgandatabase.org/OrganDetails.php?OrganID=1360.

    (Stephen Hall. December 21, 2018)

Online Documents

Currently we have no online documents associated with this organ entry. If you can provide us with digital files of contracts, correspondence, dedication programs, or any similar items, please follow this link to our document upload form to send them to us.

If you would like more information about documents included in the Database, please see our Documents Information page.

Other Websites

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Please note that we are not responsible for dead links.

Photographs

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Nave, Balcony, and Organ Case. Photograph by Fr. Jeremy A. Secrist 2015-09-01
Pipework and Writing on Organ Case. (Steamboat Frederick transported organ from St. Louis). Photograph by Fr. Jeremy A. Secrist 2015-09-01
Trackers. Photograph by Fr. Jeremy A. Secrist 2015-09-01
Keydesk. Photograph by Fr. Jeremy A. Secrist 2015-09-01
Keydesk, restored. Photograph by Fr. Jeremy Secrist 2017-04-24
Facade. Photograph by Fr. Jeremy Secrist 2017-07-18

If you can provide us with additional photographs, you may upload them through our online form. For further information please see our expectations for adding photographs.

 

Stoplist

When they are available, stoplists for organs are included in the Database. To make corrections in stoplists that you see here, please send details via e-mail to stoplists@pipeorgandatabase.org rather than submitting a new stoplist through our online form.

  • Stoplist provided by Fr. Jeremy A. Secrist
    St. Thomas, Missouri
    St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church
    
    J. G. Pfeffer   1897
    ____________________________________________________
       
    Unenclosed manual (58 notes)
    8' Open Diapason  - 58 pipes
    8' Stopped Diapason - 58 pipes
    8' Gamba (1-12 from Stopped Diapason) - 49 pipes
    8' Dulciana  - 58 pipes
    4' Rohrflute  - 58 pipes
    4' Octave  - 58 pipes
    2 2/3' Twelfth - 58 pipes
    2' Fifteenth - 58 pipes
    
    Pedal (25 notes)
    16' Subbass - 25 pipes
    Pedal coupler
    Tremulant
    Bellows signal
    
    The original double-rise feeder bellows are extant, 
    although the instrument had an electric blower 
    installed somewhere around 1948 (following the 
    tornado that destroyed the original bell tower).  
    Pending restoration in the very near future, the 
    instrument is currently not regularly used.  
    
    [Received from Fr. Jeremy A. Secrist August 31, 2015]
    
  • Click Here Stoplist provided by Fr. Jeremy A. Secrist Plain text; will open in a new window or tab.