Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

Welte-Mignon Corporation [Welte Organ Co.] View Extant Instruments View Instruments

Distinction:

New York City, New York, 1925-1929.
Classification: Builder

Update This Entry
October 16, 2015:

For further information, see: Welte & Sons Co., and Welte-Tripp Corp.

 

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 29, 2019.

October 16, 2015:
/ / / / Archived Note / / / /

The following note is from a previous version of this entry; it has been superseded by the note above, which contains new information or corrects errors or inaccuracies.

Archived Note from the OHS PC Database, derived from A Guide to North American Organbuilders, by David H. Fox (Richmond, Va., Organ Historical Society, 1991). Edited for the revised OHS Online Database website, 2017. -

Succeeded Welte & Sons Co. and Welte Organ Co.; associated with Estey-Welte Corp.; associated with Hall Organ Co. of New Haven, Connecticut, 1925–1927; pipe organ department reorganized under the control of the Estey-Welte Corp. as Welte Organ Co., 1926; firm bankrupt, 17 November 1927, acquired by Morton, Lachenruch & Co.; re-incorporated 1928; bankrupt 1929; succeeded by Welte-Tripp Corporation, 1929.

Staff: David Arthur; Carl A. Benson; Bell Brothers; Arthur Birkmaier; Heinrich Bockish; Roland Bolsvert; Karl Buselmeier; James Cole; Lloyd M. Davey; G. A. Dominique; Dittes; Robert P. Elliot; W. E. Fletcher; J. Vern Fridlund; George W. Gittins; Rudolph Glatz, George Goll; Albin Johnson; Robert T. Lytle; Frank H. Marshall; Frank Niemann; James H. Nuttall; Harry Reed; James N. Reynolds; Paul Sowada; Frank Showacre; Karl O. Staps; James Topp; W. J. Webster; Richard O. Whitelegg; Albert Whitham; Henry V. Willis; Fred W. Wimberley; Clarence A. Woodruff.

Sources:

  • The Diapason: June 1925, 3.
  • The Diapason: April 1928, 2.
  • The Diapason:March 1929, 1.
  • David Junchen, Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Organ, Vol. 2 (Pasadena: Showcase Publications, 1989), 673.
  •  

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 29, 2019.

October 30, 2004:

NOTE: This article is under development.

Research is currently being done to attempt to resolve conflicting information from different sources, and to clarify other existing information.

If you have documented information on this subject that you would like to share with the database, please contact the Builders Editor at:
 
database.builders@organsociety.org.

 

-- Interim Note --

Original note from the Organ Database with some corrections and notes from Builders editor Stephen Hall, June 24, 2017. -

Succeeded Welte & Sons Co. and Welte Organ Co.; associated with Estey-Welte Corp.; associated with Hall Organ Co. of New Haven, Connecticut, 1925-1927; pipe organ department reorganized under the control of the Estey-Welte Corp. as Welte Organ Co., 1926;1 firm bankrupt, 17 Nov. 1927, acquired by Morton Lachenbruch & Co.;2 re-incorporated 1928; bankrupt 1929; succeeded by Welte-Tripp Corporation, 1929.3

Staff: 4David Arthur; Carl A. Benson; Bell Brothers; Arthur Birkmaier; Heinrich Bockish; Roland Bolsvert; Karl Buselmeier; James Cole; Lloyd M. Davey; G. A. Dominique; Dittes; Robert P. Elliot; W. E. Fletcher; J. Vern Fridlund; George W. Gittins; Rudolph Glatz, George Goll; Albin Johnson; Robert T. Lytle; Frank H. Marshall; Frank Niemann; James H. Nuttall; Harry Reed; James N. Reynolds; Paul Sowada; Frank Showacre; Karl O. Staps; James Topp; W. J. Webster; Richard O. Whitelegg; Albert Whitham; Henry V. Willis; Fred W. Wimberley; Clarence A. Woodruff.

Editor's Notes
  1. There is considerable confusion regarding company names, and who was a subsidiary and who was the holding company.
  2. Company name corrected.
  3. Tripp was a developer and investor, not an organbuilder, he may have wanted the buildings and land rather than the company.
  4. The names of the staff are correct as far as we know.
Source:
  • David Junchen, Encyclopedia of the American Theatre Organ, Vol. 2 (Pasadena: Showcase Publications, 1989), 673.
  •  

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 29, 2019.

Database Specs:

  • 28 Organs
  • 12 Divisions
  • 4 Consoles

This builder has been viewed 628 times.