Austin Organ Co. (Opus 2138, 1950)

Location:

St. James Methodist Church
439 Greene Street
Augusta, GA 30901 US
Organ ID: 11329

Update This Entry

Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Methodist Churches
  • The organ is unaltered from its original state.
  • The organ's condition is unknown.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: Austin Universal Air
  • 15 ranks. 3 divisions. 2 manuals.
All:
  • Chest Type(s): Austin Universal Air chests
  • Position: In a case at the front of the room.
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Main:
  • Manuals: 2
  • Divisions: 3
  • Position: Console in fixed position, left.
  • Manual Compass: 61
  • Pedal Compass: 32
  • Key Action: Electrical connection from key to chest.
  • Console Style: Traditional style with roll top.
  • Stop Controls: Stop keys above top manual.
  • Combination Action: 'Hold and Set' pneumatic/mechanical system.
  • Swell Control Type: Balanced swell shoes/pedals, AGO standard placement.
  • Pedalboard Type: Concave radiating pedalboard meeting AGO Standards.
  • Has Combination Action Thumb Pistons
  • Has Coupler Reversible Toe Pistons
We received the most recent update for this console from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Database Manager on September 13, 2015:

Updated through online information from John McCraney. -- The case is freestanding at the center front of the room behind the choir. The sides are either dark-stained mahogany or walnut. The front is a stenciled pipe fence almost to the ceiling with the "M" shape, a semi-circular large pipe "tower" at each end.

Beneath the center pipes between the towers are a number of small equally-sized Roman-arched opening containing small dummy pipes.

When some structural work was going on in the 1990s, I noticed some "stove pipe/tomato can" cylinders. If memory serves, they would have been about the diameter of the "tower" pipes, with none any longer than one or two yards.

They were stenciled, but covered with grime. I did not disturb them, but I have the impression they had once been placed on a frame so as to make an inverted "V" behind the center front case pipes as they became smaller in the middle. This arrangement can sometimes be seen in Victorian pipe fronts. They perhaps had been placed in storage when the Austin was installed.

The console is below the pulpit platform in front of the choir and to the far left as one faces the organ. This church is quite handsome with superb stained glass windows.

The following is from the organ rededication program after it was renovated in 1994. It differs in some respects from Mr. Playford' account (his stoplist nomenclature matches except for the number of ranks, but the program does not indicate how many pipes are in each rank), but I suspect he is correct, as I can find no mention of a Hook and Hastings either from the Atlanta Exhibition of 1895 or St. James in the Hook & Hastings opus list. The program states 17 ranks, with 999 pipes.

From the program in 1994: "The Atlanta Exposition . . . 1895 had on exhibit a magnificent pipe organ which attracted the interest of a group from St. James. The price was $ 3,000. The women of the church raised the necessary funds. . . . [The organ] was subsequently installed in the gallery of the church.

In 1909 a number of changes were made at St. James as the educational building was renovated and the sanctuary redecorated along with the interior of the organ being rebuilt and a new motor installed. [This is probably when the gallery was removed and the choir placed behind the pulpit.] In June, 1950, the church replaced the Hook and Hastings organ with a magnificent Austin, 2-Manual with pedals electric powered pipe organ at a cost of $10, 545.25. The beautifully toned pipes from the old Hook and Hastings organ were retained in this new installation."

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on June 12, 2007:

Updated through online information from Louis Playford. -- Case and most of the pipework from the previous John Brown instrument.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on June 01, 2007:

According to information received from Louis Playford, the organ includes the case from the previous church organ -- attributed to John Brown of Wilmington, Delaware.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on December 16, 2004:

Identified through information on the Austin Organs, Inc. web site, accessed December 16, 2004

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.
Source not recorded: Open In New Tab Typed stoplist from Louis Playford
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Instrument Images:

The database contains no images for this instrument. If you have some, please share them using the update entry button on this page.

Pipe Organs in Georgia sponsored by:
This instrument has been viewed 416 times.