Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

Austin Organs, Inc. (Opus 2310, 1950s)

Location:

Grace Methodist Church
Pruett Street
Baytown, TX US
Organ ID: 13055

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Methodist Churches
  • The organ has an unknown or unreported status.
  • The organ's condition is good, but not in use.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: Austin Universal Air
  • 32 ranks. 3 manuals.
All:
  • Chest Type(s): Austin Universal Air chests
  • Position: In side chambers at the front of the room. No visible pipes.
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Main:
  • Manuals: 3
  • Position: Console in fixed position, center.
  • Key Action: Electrical connection from key to chest.
  • Stop Action: Electric connection between stop control and chest.
  • Console Style: Traditional style with roll top.
  • Stop Controls: Stop keys above top manual.
  • Swell Control Type: Balanced swell shoes/pedals.
  • Pedalboard Type: Concave radiating pedalboard meeting AGO Standards.
We received the most recent update for this console from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Database Manager on September 19, 2013:

Updated through online information from Bruce Cornely. -- Grace UMC has merged with Cedar Bayou UMC. The Grace UMC building is no longer in use, and when the building is sold the organ will be put into storage until a new building is built. It is not known if the organ will be used in the new building or sold. Cedar Bayou has a 2/35 Noack (1976) (see OHS database). It is a beautiful English style instrument.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on August 16, 2011:

Updated through online information from Bruce Cornely.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on October 10, 2007:

Updated with information from Bruce Cornely. -- I've only had one experience with fan tremulants. In the early 70s I played a 3/32 Austin (1956ish) that had fan tremulants. They were very effective especially when the chimes (in the Choir chamber) were used. The fan tremulant was easily adjusted and was quiet. I did have a problem once when tuning and the key holder turned on the tremulant. I thought I was going to be beaten to death! The organ was wonderful to play and had a very nice broad and rich sound, and rested comfortably on a 16 Contra Bass (open wood!). One of the best features of the building was (I'm told) a 16' mistake by the contractor in ceiling height, resulting in really nice acoustics. From their website it appears that they are in a new and improved building. I have no idea what the organ fate of the organ is, as several inquiries have gone unanswered.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on January 08, 2005:

Information identifying this instrument from the Austin Organs, Inc. web site, accessed December 31, 2004: http://www.austinorgans.com/organ-research.htm.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.
Source not recorded: Open In New Tab Typed stoplist from Bruce Cornely
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

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