Henry Erben (1851)

Location:

State Prison / Mental Institution
170-198 Village Drive
Staunton, VA 24401 US
Organ ID: 1377

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Social Services
  • The organ is extant in this location, possibly in original state.
  • The organ's condition is not playable.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: Slider
  • 1 manuals. 7 stops.
All:
  • Chest Type(s): Slider chests
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Main:
  • Manuals: 1
  • Stops: 7
  • Key Action: Mechanical connection from key to chest (tracker, sticker or mix).
We received the most recent update for this console from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Database Manager on December 25, 2016:

Updated through online information from Steve Bartley.
There are several names for this complex, which was started in 1825 as a "lunatic Asylum" It was used in conjunction with the Virginia Correctional system.
A newspaper article, "Richmond Enquirer" 11/25/1851, pg 1 gives a brief mention of the organ....."A VALUABLE GIFT.- The much admired Organ, which was on exhibition at the Fair in Baltimore, has been purchased by W.W. Corcoran, Esq.,of Washington, for $1000, and has been by him presented as a gift to the West Lunatic Asylum, at Staunton, Va.It was manufactured by Mr. Henry Erben, of Baltimore, and obtained a prize medal.
Erben ran a branch shop in Baltimore, run by his Brother-in-law, James Hall, though it appears by the number of articles, adverts, self promotions, and classifieds placed by Erben, he was impatient with Hall's efforts.
In an article, Sun Paper, Oct 27, 1851 pg1, the writer, describes the contents of the rooms at the Maryland Institute Fair. "Upon entering the room,a large organ, placed upon the gallery at the extreme southern end, will attract the eye. It is from the manufactory [sic] of Mr Henry Erben, of this (Baltimore) city, and was deposited by Mr. Jabez Horner. We have heard little of it, but it appears to be a fine instrument." It is possible that Erben had several organs at the fair and that the one for Staunton was one of these, smaller instruments.
The old hospital building(s) were neglected and closed/sold in 2002. A developer has converted them into condominiums.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on March 25, 2009:

Updated through on-line information from Laurence Libin.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Instrument Images:

Organ Case and Chapel Interior: Photograph by Ryan Little. Taken on 2019-02-20

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