Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

E. & G. G. Hook (Opus 314, 1862)

Location:

First Congregational Church (Unitarian)
71 Eighth Street
New Bedford, MA 02740 US
Organ ID: 14816

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Congregational Church
  • The organ has been rebuilt or substantially revised.
  • The organ's condition is not playable.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Paul R. Marchesano on May 25, 2022.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: Slider
  • 43 ranks. 2,273 pipes. 3 manuals. 47 registers.
All:
  • Chest Type(s): Slider chests
  • Position: In a gallery-level case at the rear of the room.
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Main:
  • Manuals: 3
  • Registers: 47
We received the most recent update for this console from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Paul R. Marchesano on May 25, 2022:

The organ in the Unitarian Church, New Bedford, Mass., was built by Messrs. E. and G. G. Hook, of Boston. The opening exhibition took place in the church on Friday evening, June 13th, 1862. Mr. A. T. Thorup, the organist of the church, Messrs. Wilcox and J. W Hervey played, and Miss H. E. Booth and. the choir sang. Mr. Thorup prepared the specification. The manuals· of this organ were about the first made in this country to overhang each other, which method was then announced as 'on a new plan.' This organ has three manuals, each of a compass of 56 notes, from CC to gin alt., and pedal bass compass of 27 notes, from CCC-tenor d. The case, of gothic architecture, is of solid chestnut, and the front pipes are of burnished tin. It has 37 sounding stops and 2,273 pipes, which are as follows...[see stoplist tab] -- "The Organ," New York Weekly Review of Music, Drama, Literature, Fine Arts, and Society 22:2 (Sat., January 7, 1871).

We received the most recent update for this note from Paul R. Marchesano on May 25, 2022.

Paul R. Marchesano on May 25, 2022:

"...the third instrument, E. & G. G. Hook Op. 314, was installed in the rear gallery. This instrument was at the time the largest organ in New Bedford, and it was this organ that Ralph Waldo Emerson heard when he served as interim minister of the church 1866-7. In 1874, architect William Ralph Emerson was engaged to "Victorianize" the church, and he recommended that the organ be moved to the front near the pulpit; the organ was indeed moved." -- 2005 OHS Handbook

We received the most recent update for this note from Paul R. Marchesano on May 25, 2022.

Database Manager on March 10, 2007:

Updated through online information from Bruce Gardzina. -- Rebuilt in 1891 by Hutchings. Incorporated into 1907 Hutchings-Votey. Replaced by 1966 Flentrop. Destroyed/dispersed (Laws Jr.)

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on February 28, 2005:

Identified from company publications as edited and expanded in The Hook Opus List 1829-1935, ed. William T. Van Pelt (Organ Historical Society, 1991).

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.
"The Organ," New York Weekly Review of Music, Drama, Literature, Fine Arts, and Society 22:2: Open In New Tab Order as published in 1871 Originally published Sat., January 7, 1871
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Paul R. Marchesano on May 25, 2022.

Instrument Images:

Sanctuary Interior, Chancel, and Organ Case: Archival Photograph courtesy of William T. Van Pelt.

Sanctuary Interior, Chancel, and Organ Case: Archival Photograph courtesy of William T. Van Pelt.

Chancel and Organ Case: Archival Photograph courtesy of William T. Van Pelt.

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