Henry Erben (1856)

Location:

St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church
15706 St. Patrick Church Rd.
Mount Savage, MD 21545 US
Organ ID: 1766

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Roman Catholic Churches
  • The organ is extant in this location, possibly in original state.
  • The organ's condition is good, but not in use.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Scot Huntington on October 09, 2020.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: Slider
  • 6 ranks. 1 divisions. 1 manuals. 7 stops. 7 registers.
All:
  • Chest Type(s): Slider chests
  • Position: In a gallery-level case at the rear of the room.
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on June 17, 2018.
Gallery:
  • Built by Henry Erben
  • Manuals: 1
  • Divisions: 1
  • Stops: 7
  • Registers: 7
  • Position: Keydesk attached, manuals set into case.
  • Manual Compass: 56
  • Pedal Compass: 18
  • Key Action: Mechanical connection from key to chest (tracker, sticker or mix).
  • Stop Action: Mechanical connection between stop control and chest.
  • Stop Controls: Drawknobs in vertical rows on flat jambs.
  • Combination Action: No combination action.
  • Swell Control Type: Trigger/hitch-down swell.
  • Pedalboard Type: Flat straight pedalboard.
We received the most recent update for this console from Jim Stettner on October 09, 2020.
Scot Huntington on October 11, 2020:

Carl's supposition that this organ was originally installed in St. Ignatius in this town is likely correct. An historical marker on the original site of St. Ignatius states the parish was formed in 1793, the church was built in 1826 "to serve the early pioneers" and when it became too small to contain the congregation, it was torn down in 1863 and replaced with the present St. Patrick's ediface.

We received the most recent update for this note from Scot Huntington on October 11, 2020.

Scot Huntington on October 09, 2020:

A clarification of the earlier post regarding the church's disposition. It has not been sold as first related to me, but is instead being leased to a non-profit group called the Friends of St. Patrick's Mount Savage, Inc. who have pledged to maintain the building and provide two Masses annually using visiting clergy. This building falls under the Our Lady of the Mountains Parish-- a 2012 consolidation of 8 local parishes into one. This parish recently closed two buildings, selling one and leasing this one to the independent group.

We received the most recent update for this note from Scot Huntington on October 09, 2020.

Scot Huntington on October 09, 2020:

The church closed in January, 2020 and the building was sold. The group purchasing the building have stated their intention to preserve the organ in place.

The church building began construction in 1863 and was consecrated in 1865. The organ nameplate is dated 1856. The case was originally faux-grained, and was painted white in the later portion of the 20th century. It is not yet known what date the organ was purchased for St. Patrick's, and is likely second-hand. The keydesk doors slide into the case and the interior is walnut. At present, the doors have recently been painted shut by careless painters, and the organ while usable before the doors were painted, is in need of a full restoration. The pull-down pedal is permanently coupled to the manual, and the organ has been fitted with an electric blower.

We received the most recent update for this note from Scot Huntington on October 09, 2020.

Database Manager on June 17, 2018:

Updated by Carl Schwartz, who has heard or played the organ.
St. Ignatius Church mentioned as a possible earlier location of the organ was a building just down the street, replaced by the present church and the organ moved. Same parish.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on December 18, 2018.

Database Manager on May 21, 2005:

No pedal pipes.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on October 30, 2004:

Unused but playable as of 2003. Electronic in use.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.
Taken from console.: Open In New Tab
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Scot Huntington on October 12, 2020.

Instrument Images:

Erben organ in rear gallery.: Photograph by Rick Morrison, submitted by Scot Huntington. Taken approx. ca. 1975

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