Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

W. W. Kimball Co. (1905ca.)

Location:

Grace Episcopal Church
Franklin Street
Astoria, OR US
Organ ID: 25675

Update This Entry

Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Episcopal and Anglican Churches
  • The organ has been rebuilt or substantially revised.
  • The organ's condition is unknown.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: Ventil
  • 7 ranks. 384 pipes. 3 divisions. 2 manuals. 7 stops. 7 registers.
All:
  • Chest Type(s): Ventil chests
  • Position: In a case at the front of the room.
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Main:
  • Manuals: 2
  • Divisions: 3
  • Stops: 7
  • Registers: 7
  • Position: Keydesk attached.
  • Manual Compass: 61
  • Pedal Compass: 30
  • Key Action: Tubular-pneumatic connection from key to chest.
  • Stop Action: Tubular-pneumatic connection between stop control and chest.
  • Console Style: Traditional style with a keyboard cover that can be lifted to form a music rack.
  • Stop Controls: Drawknobs in horizontal rows on flat jambs.
  • Combination Action: No combination action.
  • Swell Control Type: Balanced swell shoes/pedals.
  • Pedalboard Type: Flat straight pedalboard.
We received the most recent update for this console from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Database Manager on December 01, 2007:

On line update from Lanny Hochhalter: The church had a 25 member "renowned" choir of men and boys from the late 1880's until the early 1910's. Carl Denton, Organist of Trinity Church, Portland (OR) gave the dedication recital on the 1905 Kimball, including "The Lost Chord" and "The Angel's Serenade." The Kimball was hand-pumped until 1931 when an electric blower was installed.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on March 19, 2007:

Identified through on-line information from James R. Stettner. -- The organ was free-standing and encased at the front of the room on the right side. The 3-sectional facade contained 23 stencilled and gold-leafed pipes arranged: 5-13-5. The drawknobs were in beveled jambs and had oblique faces. Drawknob couplers were over the Swell keys. The organ remained hand-pumped until an electric blower was added ca. 1932.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Instrument Images:

Chancel: Photo in church archives. Digital image by Lanny Hochhalter.. Taken on 1950-11-29

This instrument has been viewed 367 times.