Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

Estey Organ Co. (Opus 707, 1909)

Location:

McKendree Methodist Episcopal Church, South
523 Church Street
Nashville, TN 37219 US
Organ ID: 27101

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Methodist Churches
  • The organ is no longer at this location; destroyed, dispersed, relocated or taken in trade.
  • The organ's condition is unknown.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: Information unknown or not applicable
  • 4 divisions. 3 manuals.
All:
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Main:
  • Manuals: 3
  • Divisions: 4
  • Manual Compass: 61
  • Pedal Compass: 30
We received the most recent update for this console from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Database Manager on August 13, 2012:

Updated through online information from Melvin Potts. -- This organ was purchased by David Moore of Nashville and removed from church before installation of the 1968 Austin. Mr. Moore was a college classmate of mine. However, he left Nashville many years ago. I do not believe that he still has the organ.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on June 10, 2012:

Updated through online information from Will Dunklin.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on July 09, 2008:

Updated through on-line information from James R. Stettner. -- The February 1, 1910 issue of The Diapason announces the organ, but lists it as a 3-manual. This might be because of an Echo divison operating on electric action in the rear gallery. The stop action was the Haskell miniature keyboard placed above the Swell keys. The organ was a gift of the women of the church, and was dedicated January 6, 1910 by Mr. William M. Jenkins of 2nd Presbyterian Church in St. Louis, MO. The organ is reported to have had 46 stops.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on July 06, 2007:

Identified by James R. Stettner through information from the Estey Opus List, published in The Boston Organ Club newsletter, 1973-1979.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Instrument Images:

Church Exterior: (ca. 1915) Vintage Postcard; image courtesy of William Dunklin.

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