Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

Lewis & Hitchcock, Inc. (Opus 124, 1925)

Location:

William Singleton Lodge (Masonic)
4441 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20016 US
Organ ID: 38638

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Lodges and Clubs
  • The organ is unaltered from its original state.
  • The organ's condition is unknown.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: EP pitman
  • 7 ranks. 398 pipes. 3 divisions. 2 manuals. 11 stops. 7 registers.
All:
  • Chest Type(s): EP pitman chests
  • Position: In a gallery-level case at the rear of the room.
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Main:
  • Manuals: 2
  • Divisions: 3
  • Stops: 11
  • Registers: 7
  • Position: Keydesk attached.
  • Manual Compass: 61
  • Pedal Compass: 32
  • Key Action: Electrical connection from key to chest.
  • Stop Action: Electric connection between stop control and chest.
  • Console Style: Traditional style with roll top.
  • Stop Controls: Stop keys above top manual.
  • Combination Action: No combination action.
  • Swell Control Type: Balanced swell shoes/pedals, AGO standard placement.
  • Pedalboard Type: Concave radiating pedalboard meeting AGO Standards.
  • Has Crescendo Pedal
  • Has Coupler Reversible Toe Pistons
We received the most recent update for this console from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Database Manager on January 21, 2009:

Updated through on-line information from Gerald Piercey. -- The organ is high in a gallery at the west end. The access is through a steep stairway behind the organ chamber, coming out a door on the right of the façade. The matching door on the left admits the tuner to the chamber. There is a façade above and to each side of the attached console, 7/19/7 arrangement. All façade pipes are real, but silent, I assume as they were within sight of those in the gallery, and a languid was appropriate. When blown, they produce a flutey tone; almost all are of the same length, about 5 1/3- G to 4- F. A Gong piston on the right Swell keycheek strikes the lowest A chime.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on February 11, 2019.

Database Manager on January 18, 2009:

Identified through information from Gerald Piercey of Lewis & Hitchcock: "This was a common design, duplex action, one rank extended into the pedal. Many were built as practice organs for colleges and for small churches as well as Masonic Temples. This is one of the few still left in the original location."

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Instrument Images:

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