George Jardine & Son (Opus 1019, 1876)

Exhibited in the 1969 OHS convention(s)

Location:

Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church
Claremont Avenue near Park Avenue
New York City: Brooklyn, NY 11205 US
Organ ID: 4353

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Roman Catholic Churches
  • The organ has an unknown or unreported status.
  • The organ's condition is unknown.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Paul R. Marchesano on October 25, 2022.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: Slider
  • 38 ranks. 2,040 pipes. 4 divisions. 3 manuals. 34 stops.
All:
  • Chest Type(s): Slider chests
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Main:
  • Manuals: 3
  • Divisions: 4
  • Stops: 34
  • Manual Compass: 58
  • Pedal Compass: 30
  • Key Action: Mechanical connection from key to chest (tracker, sticker or mix).
  • Stop Action: Mechanical connection between stop control and chest.
We received the most recent update for this console from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Paul R. Marchesano on October 25, 2022:

The George Jardine & Son organ in Sacred Heart Church dates from the completion of the building in 1876 and is installed in a rear gallery case measuring approximately 25 feet high by 12 feet deep by 20 feet wide. Notable as one of Jardine's quality installations, this organ has mahogany tables for the chests and much of the pipe metal is spotted, indicating about a 60% tin content. Of special interest is the 4' Gamba Clarion stop on the Great, a labial (reedless) rank that was used in place of a Clarion. The Low C pipe of the "Clarine" stop is stamped 'Keraulophon' and had a label of a Paris pipe maker, Henri Zimmerman. Total cost of the organ was $7,535.

On Sunday evening, September 17, 1876, the organ was formally opened with a concert presented by Professor John M. Loretz, Jr., organist of the church, who began with a prelude and fugue by Bach. Sharing the program was "an excellent chorus of thirty voices," directed by Professor L. Weinstein, and six vocal soloists. The Brooklyn Eagle (Sept. 18, 1876) reported that Prof. Loretz "filled the building with grand music which held the undivided attention of the audience whenever he played." The review continued with: "The finest playing of the evening was then done by Professor Loretz, who performed a symphony entitled, "Music of Nature," which was a series of sketches in which were musically represented. Morning: rising of the sun, warbling of birds, rustling of leaves and peasant's song. Noon: storm, frightened birds, rain, hail, etc., all of which finally died away, leaving the evening calm and beautiful, when the notes of the cuckoo, nightingale, pipers gathering their flocks, hymns of shepherds were heard. The music was excellently rendered, and well represented the ideas which it intended to convey."

This organ is the largest extant Jardine organ from the 1870s, although it is not in original condition. Over the years several stops were changed and several labels replaced. The organ has received restorative repairs by Hartman-Beaty (1969, 1975), Jack Alberti (1978), Andover (1985) and David Schmauch (2001). -- NYC AGO PIpe Organ Project

We received the most recent update for this note from Paul R. Marchesano on October 25, 2022.

Database Manager on November 25, 2010:

Updated through on-line information from Connor Annable.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on October 30, 2004:

Status Note: There 1974

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on October 30, 2004:

Some emergency repairs by Hartman-Beaty for 1969 OHS convention. Compass 58/30. Cost was $15,000. Blown by two men.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.
Source not recorded: Open In New Tab Typed stoplist from the OHS PC Database.
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.
New Organ and Beautiful Interior: Open In New Tab Article describing the new organ, Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Document created on 1876-09-05
We received the most recent update for this document from Paul R. Marchesano on October 25, 2022.

Instrument Images:

Organ case in loft: Photograph from an archival source: NYC AGO Pipe Organ Project, submitted by Paul R. Marchesano. Taken approx. 1969 (?)

Console: Photograph from an archival source: NYC AGO Pipe Organ Project, submitted by Paul R. Marchesano. Taken approx. after 1969

Keyboards: Photograph from an archival source: NYC AGO Pipe Organ Project, submitted by Paul R. Marchesano. Taken approx. after 1969

Low C of the 4' Clarine (Keraulophon) showing what remains of the famous Henri Zimmerman, Paris label: Photograph from an archival source: NYC AGO Pipe Organ Project, submitted by Paul R. Marchesano. Taken approx. after 1969

Graffiti by Reuben Midmer: Photograph from an archival source: NYC AGO Pipe Organ Project, submitted by Paul R. Marchesano. Taken approx. after 1969

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