Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

Geo. Kilgen & Son, Inc. (1885)

Location:

Our Lady of Sorrows R.C. Church
403 Valencia Street
Las Vegas, NM 87701 US
Sanctuary; rear gallery
Organ ID: 4773

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Roman Catholic Churches
  • The organ is unaltered from its original state.
  • The organ's condition needs attention, but in usable condition.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from James R. Stettner on December 08, 2020.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: Slider
  • 28 ranks. 1,590 pipes. 3 divisions. 2 manuals. 25 stops. 27 registers.
All:
  • Chest Type(s): Slider chests
  • Position: In a gallery-level case at the rear of the room.
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Main:
  • Manuals: 2
  • Divisions: 3
  • Stops: 25
  • Registers: 27
  • Manual Compass: 58
  • Pedal Compass: 27
  • Key Action: Mechanical connection from key to chest (tracker, sticker or mix).
  • Stop Action: Mechanical connection between stop control and chest.
  • Has Combination Action Thumb Pistons
  • Has Coupler Reversible Toe Pistons
We received the most recent update for this console from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Database Manager on June 21, 2017:

Updated by David Beatty, who has heard or played the organ.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on June 21, 2017:

Updated by David Beatty

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on June 20, 2017:

Updated by David Beatty, who has heard or played the organ.
The pedal keys are spaced closer together than AGO standard. "White" keys are brown against black sharp/flat keys.
"P" and "FF" (tutti) pistons are placed beneath both Swell and Great manuals, but are not functional at this time. The coupler draw knobs, as indicated in the stoplist, are not functional at this time. The action is quite stiff on both manuals at this time, but still playable. There has been a recent tuning, as attested by Bonnie Bolton, which seems to have held up. A great majority of pipes are sounding, although, understandably at this time, there is some variety in volume as one proceeds up the scale, with higher notes being more dependable than lower notes. The organ has some lovely stops that can only be enhanced by the restoration efforts.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on May 04, 2017:

Updated by John Grunow, who maintains the organ.
The printed specification incorrectly states there is a pneumatic key assist. This is not true. The confusion arises from a proposed organ built by Marshall Brothers of Milwaukee that appears in some historic documents in the church's archive. A local businessman traveled to St. Louis and was shown the Marshall and Kilgen organs displayed at the Mercantile Library in St. Louis. Records indicate they couldn't afford the Marshall instrument and instead purchased the Kilgen. The instrument arrived in Las Vegas in early October 1885 and was dedicated in late November of the same year. George and Charles Kilgen traveled from St. Louis to install the organ. Most, if not all flue ranks are inscribed with the initials G.H.K. on low C. Reed stops are not marked. Wind pressure is 3-1/2" for the entire instrument. The organ is in the beginning stages of a multiyear restoration. My company has been entrusted with this work. The goal is to restore it to original condition with the exception of an electric blower and tuning slides to protect previously cone-tuned pipes from further future damage.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on February 01, 2016:

Updated through online information from James R. Stettner.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on January 24, 2016:

Updated through online information from James R. Stettner.
While the nameplate says Geo. Kilgen, one of the videos available on either the website or the Facebook page states that the organ was built by Marshall Bros. in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on July 07, 2009:

Updated through online information from alan sciranko.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on February 27, 2007:

Updated through online information from James R. Stettner.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on October 30, 2004:

Status Note: There 1989.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.
Source not recorded: Open In New Tab Stoplist provided by Noel Channon
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Instrument Images:

Organ Case and Facade Pipes in rear gallery: Photograph by David Beatty. Taken on 2017-06-19

Keydesk: Photograph by David Beatty. Taken on 2017-06-19

Pedalboard L to R: hitchdown to activate Tremolo draw knob, unknown hitchdown, Swell shoe, nonfunctional organ on/off switch: Photograph by David Beatty. Taken on 2017-06-19

Left Stop Jamb: Photograph by David Beatty. Taken on 2017-06-19

Right Stop Jamb: Photograph by David Beatty. Taken on 2017-06-19

Builder's Nameplate with "FF" piston ("P" piston is further to the left.): Photograph by David Beatty. Taken on 2017-06-19

Keydesk detail, showing left bifold door closed in front of manuals. (Separate top piece folds back above music rack.): Photograph by David Beatty. Taken on 2017-06-19

Organ Case and Facade Pipes: Photograph by David Beatty. Taken on 2017-06-19

Swell pipes: Photograph by David Beatty. Taken on 2017-06-19

Great pipes: Photograph by David Beatty. Taken on 2017-06-19

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