A. B. Felgemaker Co. (Opus 522, 1888)

Location:

Heavenly Rest Episcopal / Central Church of the Nazarene / Changing Lives Now Ministry / My Church Ohio
340 S. Plum Street
Springfield, OH 45506 US
Organ ID: 51452

Update This Entry

Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Churches of undetermined denomination
  • The organ has been altered from its original state.
  • The organ's condition is unknown.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: Slider
  • 3 divisions. 2 manuals. 8 stops. 10 registers.
Great:
  • Chest Type(s): Slider chests
  • Position: In a case at the front of the room.
  • Built by A. B. Felgemaker Co.
We received the most recent update for this division from Jim Stettner on January 30, 2022.

Swell (Expressive):
  • Chest Type(s): Slider chests
  • Position: In a case at the front of the room.
  • Built by A. B. Felgemaker Co.
We received the most recent update for this division from Jim Stettner on January 30, 2022.

Pedal:
  • Chest Type(s): Slider chests
  • Position: In a case at the front of the room.
  • Built by A. B. Felgemaker Co.
We received the most recent update for this division from Jim Stettner on January 30, 2022.
Main:
  • Built by A. B. Felgemaker Co.
  • Manuals: 2
  • Divisions: 3
  • Stops: 8
  • Registers: 10
  • Position: Keydesk attached.
  • Manual Compass: 61
  • Pedal Compass: 27
  • Key Action: Mechanical connection from key to chest (tracker, sticker or mix).
  • Stop Action: Mechanical connection between stop control and chest.
  • Console Style: Traditional style with a keyboard cover that can be lifted to form a music rack.
  • Stop Controls: Drawknobs in horizontal rows on terraced/stepped jambs.
  • Combination Action: No combination action.
  • Swell Control Type: Balanced swell shoes/pedals.
  • Pedalboard Type: Flat straight pedalboard.
We received the most recent update for this console from Jim Stettner on January 30, 2022.
J. A. Hefner on January 30, 2022:

When Mark and I photographed the organ in 2017, the pastor's wife told us the organ had a fixed life of five years until it was removed and the chancel stage widened. As noted earlier, they were ahead of schedule and removed the organ by March 2019. The window next to the organ was bricked up, and the organ's current location and disposition are unknown.

We received the most recent update for this note from J. A. Hefner on January 30, 2022.

Timothy E. Conyers on May 25, 2020:

The instrument was removed in early March 2019. Video of worship services on the My Church Ohio Facebook page, show the organ there in Febuary 2019. It does not appear in the March 17, 2019 video.
source: https://www.facebook.com/pg/mychurchohio/videos/

We received the most recent update for this note from Timothy E. Conyers on May 25, 2020.

Database Manager on May 25, 2017:

Updated by J. A. Hefner, listing conversations with this person as the source of the information: Aaron M. Tellers (Tellers Organ Co.).
According to Aaron Tellers, this is Felgemaker Opus 522, originally installed in this building in 1888.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on May 24, 2017:

Updated by J. A. Hefner, who gave this as the source of the information: personal inspection of organ with Mark Stickford. [See Documents]. .

We received the most recent update for this note from Jim Stettner on January 30, 2022.

Database Manager on May 15, 2017:

Updated by J. A. Hefner, naming this as the source of information: "The Centennial Celebration of Springfield, Ohio: Held August 4th to 10th, 1901". Additionally, J. A. Hefner listed this website as a source of information: http://www.mychurchohio.com.

The organ still appears in a photo taken ca. March 2017, seen on the My Church Ohio website [seems to be successor to Changing Lives Now, even though the building's registered owner is still Changing Lives Now]. The property and sanctuary seem to have been renovated somewhat, though I am waiting on more details about the organ's condition.

The church building was originally built for "Church of the Heavenly Rest, Protestant Episcopal" [the engraved block can be seen on the church front, plus the 1888 cornerstone], funded by donation from William Foos and his wife. The dedication was 2 December 1888, performed by Rev C. M. Young of Greenville, with Miss Bassett as organist. [from "The Centennial Celebration of Springfield, Ohio: Held August 4th to 10th, 1901"].

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on December 08, 2016:

Updated through online information from J. A. Hefner.
Clark County Auditor records show the church was built in 1888, possibly narrowing down information on the organ. Changing Lives Now Ministry now operates in the building, though I have yet to contact them regarding the organ [if it still exists].

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on June 06, 2013:

Updated through online information from Timothy E. Conyers. -- Examination of the organ in November 1997 - The instrument is in a case on the right side of the chancel. The attached keydesk places the organist's back to the chancel area and choir. The facade pipes above the keydesk had metal pipes painted white with solid gold accents on the mouth, and a gold line accent on the foot and on the body above the mouth. The wooden pipes facing the nave were also painted white with a gold line accent above the mouth. The pipes above the keydesk were in three flat sections. The two end "towers" had a horizontal small decorative wooden carving near the top of the pipes. I believe the center section had a similar carving, only slightly higher than the two side carvings. The large wooden pipes facing the congregation ascended slightly in height before leveling off and reaching the nave wall. These pipes were beside a large stained glass window. A small hole in the glass exposed the pipes to the elements. There is no evidence in the woodwork to indicate there had ever been a hand crank for the bellows. It may have originally had a water motor, a common feature for organs of this age. The instrument had been electrified at some point. The current blower may have been in the basement as I do not recall much noise being produced from a motor. In spite of its lack of care and tuning, the instrument had a beautiful tonal quality.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on June 05, 2013:

This entry describes an original installation of a new pipe organ. Identified by Timothy E. Conyers, based on personal knowledge of the organ. -- I played this organ in November 1997. The building had been purchased by the Church of the Nazarene for a multi-racial congregation. The church was very old and beautiful, probably built in the latter half of the 1800's or very early 1900's. I was told it had originally been a Presbyterian Church and at some point the Springfield First Church of the Nazarene had once owned the building.
The building was in poor condition and needed repairs. Men from across the church district formed a Work & Witness Team to fix some of the major problems of the building. A special singspiration service was held a few weeks later with an invitation extended to all who had assisted. ... The trip took 1 1/2 hours, so we arrived about an hour before the service. I was allowed to examine the instrument during this waiting period.
The organ was playable but not usable. It needed repairs and tuning. There were air leaks and some stops did not play. To one side of the façade was a large stained glass window with a few small broken panes. Most of the glass had been covered except for a section near the top of the organ façade. Weather elements and cold air was able to come through the broken glass and onto the pipes that faced the congregation.
I was unable to examine the interior of the case. The instrument appeared to have been a tracker organ but I cannot be certain of this fact. It had been electrified at some point but otherwise appeared to be in its original state. Unfortunately I did not get a stop list or builder, and cannot recall if it even had a name plate on the console. I was questioned by the pastor about the possibility of the congregation selling the instrument. I recommended contacting the Organ Clearing House, American Guild of Organist, and the Organ Historical Society.
The current condition or location of this instrument is unknown. The Springfield Central Church of the Nazarene is no longer on the District roster of active congregations and has not been for several years. Satellite and street images reveal the building is still standing and apparently being used for some purpose as a three story addition has been added to the rear.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on February 11, 2019.
Stoplist taken from the console: Open In New Tab Original document from . Originally published 2017-05-24
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Jim Stettner on January 30, 2022.
History of Church and Felgemaker Organ; Status Report on Organ (2017) by J. A. Hefner: Open In New Tab History of the church's owners and report on the condition of the organ in 2017
Document created on 2017-05-24
We received the most recent update for this document from Jim Stettner on January 30, 2022.

Instrument Images:

Organ Case: Photograph courtesy of Timothy E. Conyers. Taken on 1995-11-01

Builder's Nameplate "A. B. Felgemaker / Erie, Pa." stencil: Photograph by J. A. Hefner. Taken on 2017-05-23

Organ Case: Photograph by J. A. Hefner. Taken on 2017-05-23

Console: Photograph by Mark Stickford. Taken on 2017-05-23

Pedal (Bourbon) Pipes: Photograph by J. A. Hefner. Taken on 2017-05-23

Expression Pedal: Photograph by Mark Stickford. Taken on 2017-05-23

Facade Pipes: Photograph by J. A. Hefner. Taken on 2017-05-23

Left Stop Jamb: Photograph by Mark Stickford. Taken on 2017-05-23

Right Stop Jamb: Photograph by Mark Stickford. Taken on 2017-05-23

Organ Case and Console: Photograph by J. A. Hefner. Taken on 2017-05-23

Church Exterior: Photograph by J. A. Hefner. Taken on 2017-05-23

Sanctuary Interior: Photograph by J. A. Hefner. Taken on 2017-05-23

This instrument has been viewed 545 times.