Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

W. W. Kimball Co. (Opus KPO 577, 1904)

Location:

Lyceum (Auditorium) Theatre
1100 11th Street
Minneapolis, MN 55403 US
Organ ID: 55020

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Theatres, Cinemas, Movie Houses
  • The organ is no longer a complete instrument; dispersed/parted out.
  • The organ's condition is unknown.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Jim Stettner on May 02, 2021.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: Information unknown or not applicable
  • 5 divisions. 4 manuals.
All:
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Main:
  • Built by W. W. Kimball Co.
  • Manuals: 4
  • Divisions: 5
  • Manual Compass: 61
  • Pedal Compass: 32
  • Key Action: Tubular-pneumatic connection from key to chest.
  • Stop Action: Tubular-pneumatic connection between stop control and chest.
  • Console Style: Traditional style without cover.
  • Swell Control Type: Balanced swell shoes/pedals.
  • Pedalboard Type: Concave radiating pedalboard.
  • Has Crescendo Pedal
We received the most recent update for this console from Jim Stettner on January 16, 2021.
Jim Stettner on January 16, 2021:

Notes from the Twin Cities AGO Organ List: Also known as the Minneapolis Auditorium from when it was built (1905) until 1924, prior to construction of the Grant Street complex at the end of the 1920's. The building was modeled after Symphony Hall in Boston and built by Northwest Life Insurance Co. From 1924-1958 it was known as the New Lyceum following a remodel of the old Auditorium. It featured a movie house on the first floor, a ballroom on the second, a tea room on the third, and a rehearsal hall on the fourth. It became home to the Minneapolis Symphony in 1903 [sic]. On August 15, 1958 the building was purchased by the Soul's Harbor religious organization. The group moved out temporarily in 1973. Today it is located in St. Louis Park in a converted church. The building was razed on July 14, 1973 to make way for Orchestra Hall.

We have no further information about this organ. The largest pipes of the 32' Bourdon found their way to The Church of Sts. Peter and Paul in Mankato, MN.

A 1905 full-page article in the Minneapolis Journal has a description of the organ.

We received the most recent update for this note from Jim Stettner on January 16, 2021.

Database Manager on March 02, 2016:

Updated through online information from Mark Kieffer.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on March 02, 2016:

Updated through online information from Mark Kieffer.
The organ was parted out when the building was razed in the early 1970s for the construction of Orchestra Hall.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Instrument Images:

Organ console: Photograph from an archival source: The Minneapolis Journal, February 25, 1905, page 16, submitted by Jim Stettner. Taken approx. early 1905

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