Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

C. Franklin Legge Organ Co.

Location:

Riverdale Presbyterian Church
662 Pape Avenue
Toronto, ON M4K 3S5 CA
Sanctuary
Organ ID: 66490

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Presbyterian Churches
  • The organ is no longer at this location; destroyed, dispersed, relocated or taken in trade.
  • The organ's condition is not playable.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Paul R. Marchesano on October 27, 2020.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: EP unit
  • 9 ranks. 2 divisions. 3 manuals. 9 stops.
Swell:
  • Chest Type(s): EP unit chests
  • Position: In center chambers at the front of the room. Facade pipes or case front visible.
  • Built by C. Franklin Legge Organ Co.
We received the most recent update for this division from Gordon Slater on October 25, 2020.

Great:
  • Chest Type(s): EP unit chests
  • Position: In center chambers at the front of the room. Facade pipes or case front visible.
  • Built by C. Franklin Legge Organ Co.
We received the most recent update for this division from Gordon Slater on October 25, 2020.

Choir:
  • Chest Type(s): EP unit chests
  • Position: In center chambers at the front of the room. Facade pipes or case front visible.
  • Built by C. Franklin Legge Organ Co.
We received the most recent update for this division from Gordon Slater on October 25, 2020.

Pedal:
  • Chest Type(s): EP unit chests
  • Position: In center chambers at the front of the room. Facade pipes or case front visible.
  • Built by C. Franklin Legge Organ Co.
We received the most recent update for this division from Gordon Slater on October 25, 2020.
Sanctuary:
  • Built by C. Franklin Legge Organ Co.
  • Manuals: 3
  • Divisions: 2
  • Stops: 9
  • Position: Console in fixed position, center.
  • Manual Compass: 73
  • Pedal Compass: 35
  • Key Action: Electrical connection from key to chest.
  • Stop Action: Electric connection between stop control and chest.
  • Console Style: Traditional style with roll top.
  • Stop Controls: Stop keys above top manual.
  • Combination Action: 'Hold and Set' pneumatic/mechanical system.
  • Combination Action Name: tripper
  • Swell Control Type: Balanced swell shoes/pedals, AGO standard placement.
  • Pedalboard Type: Concave radiating pedalboard not meeting AGO standards.
  • Has Crescendo Pedal
  • Has Tutti Reversible Toe Piston(s)
  • Has Combination Action Thumb Piston(s)
  • Has Combination Action Toe Piston(s)
We received the most recent update for this console from Gordon Slater on October 29, 2020.
Gordon Slater on October 26, 2020:

The organ was 9-ranks total, with 6 under expression and 3 unenclosed.

Unexpressive: Diapason 1, Diapason 2, Doppel Flute, Double-valved Bourdon/Gedeckt (ext. Doppel Flute and Stopped Diapason), & harp Expressive: Violin Diapason, Stopped Diapason, Salicional, Aeoline, Cornopean, Oboe, and chimes.

All ranks start on AAA, including the Pedal Bourdon/Gedeckt, which starts on AAAA in the 32' octave.

We received the most recent update for this note from Gordon Slater on October 26, 2020.

Gordon Slater on October 25, 2020:

The two unexpressive diapasons were large of scale and made of thick, unspotted pipe metal, complete with linen casting marks. The facade was dummy (no languid), zinc, gold-coloured, diapason-type pipes.

The Tremulant was connected to the enclosed, 6-rank chest but it shook the 3 unenclosed ranks as well because there was only one reservoir for the whole instrument.

Percussion: harp (unexpressive), chimes (expressive). The chime tubes were all of the same diameter, so they clearly were not Deagan Class A.

The original, A-F 33-note pedalboard was standing, disused, in the chamber during my tenure. The half of the chamber not occupied by the organ was used as storage for Christmas decorations.

Single-pole electromagnets were used throughout, hence the polarity reverser on the reservoir. These magnets were of low DC resistance, so the bronze-on-bronze key contacts and relay contacts had many dead notes (arc-suppressing diodes had not been invented when the organ was built). The blower was next to the coal bin. Fortunately, by the time I worked at the church (1969-72), the heating had been converted to natural gas.

I worked for the builder's son, C. F. David Legge (Legge Organ Co. Ltd.) 1970-77. David told me: 1) His father used A-A 73-note manuals and the A-F pedalboard because that's what a piano had. 2) David replaced the A-F pedalboard with an AGO standard one. 3) David replaced the generator with a transformer power supply and a selenium rectifier. 4) The church ran out of money while the organ was being built, hence the many shortcuts.

We received the most recent update for this note from Jim Stettner on October 26, 2020.

Gordon Slater on October 25, 2020:

The organ occupied only half of the large chamber. The 1200-seat Sanctuary with its 3-second reverberation made the economical organ sound acceptable. I was Organist and Choir Director from 1969 to 1972.

The Sanctuary was sold off ca. 1980 and made into condominiums. I don't know what became of the organ.

We received the most recent update for this note from Jim Stettner on October 26, 2020.

Instrument Images:

73–note manuals A-A. This AGO pedalboard is not original. Gordon Slater, Organist & Choirmaster 1969–1972: Photograph by James B. Slater, submitted by Gordon Slater. Taken approx. 1970

Console: Photograph from an archival source: Builder's catalogue, submitted by Gordon Slater. Taken approx. 1930

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