Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

Martin Ott Pipe Organ Co. (1975)

Originally Wilhelm [William] Metz (1846-1850)
Exhibited in the 1979 OHS convention

Location:

Saint Salvator Evangelical Lutheran Church
179 W Church Street
Venedy, IL 62214 US
Sanctuary; rear gallery
Organ ID: 68884

Update This Entry

Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Lutheran Churches
  • The organ is unaltered from its original state.
  • The organ's condition is good, used occasionally.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Jim Stettner on November 24, 2021.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: Slider
  • 15 ranks. 703 pipes. 2 divisions. 1 manuals. 12 stops. 14 registers.
Manual:
  • Chest Type(s): Slider chests
  • Position: In a case at the front of the room.
  • Built by Wilhelm [William] Metz
We received the most recent update for this division from Jim Stettner on November 24, 2021.

Pedal:
  • Chest Type(s): Slider chests
  • Position: In a gallery-level case at the rear of the room.
  • Built by Wilhelm [William] Metz
We received the most recent update for this division from Jim Stettner on November 24, 2021.
Keydesk:
  • Built by Geo. Kilgen & Son, Inc.
  • Manuals: 1
  • Divisions: 2
  • Stops: 12
  • Registers: 14
  • Position: Keydesk attached.
  • Manual Compass: 54
  • Pedal Compass: 24
  • Key Action: Mechanical connection from key to chest (tracker, sticker or mix).
  • Stop Action: Mechanical connection between stop control and chest.
  • Console Style: Traditional style without cover.
  • Stop Controls: Drawknobs in horizontal rows on terraced/stepped jambs.
  • Combination Action: Fixed mechanical system.
  • Swell Control Type: No enclosed divisions.
  • Pedalboard Type: Flat straight pedalboard.
  • Has Combination Action Foot Trundles
We received the most recent update for this console from Paul R. Marchesano on August 10, 2021.
Paul R. Marchesano on August 10, 2021:

Though the builder of this instrument is not known for certain, internal evidence suggests that it is the work of J. G. Pfeffer, and it appears to date from 1865. The projecting keydesk and the action date from the 1904 Kilgen rebuild, which was undertaken to "modernize" the organ, according to church records. Originally, the instrument had folding doors covering a recessed keydesk. The organ case and frame are designed to accept a second division, but there are no signs that the organ has. ever had more than one division. A plywood top was installed over the case in the 1975 renovation. An unpublished dissertation on the organ has been written by Richard Haas. * According to The Organ Handbook by Hans Klotz, published by Concordia Publishing House, St. Louis, in 1969, " ... the 'Calcant' (Kalkantenruf) ... signals to the person in charge of treadling or cocking the bellows ... " -- Information from 1979 OHS Handbook

Since the above publication it has been determined that the organ was probably relocated from Trinity Lutheran, 4th Street, St. Louis, c. 1865 by Pfeffer and not originally built by the Pfeffer firm.

We received the most recent update for this note from Paul R. Marchesano on August 10, 2021.
1979 OHS Handbook: Open In New Tab Originally published June 1979
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Jim Stettner on November 24, 2021.

Instrument Images:

Organ case with images of some stop knob faces: Photograph from an archival source: 1979 OHS Handbook, submitted by Paul R. Marchesano. Taken approx. 1979

Organ in rear gallery: Church Facebook page, submitted by James R. Stettner. Taken on 2018-12-15

Organ case and keydesk: Photograph by Photograph by Diane Meyer on 'Respublica', submitted by Jim Stettner. Taken on 2011-05-01

Keydesk: Photograph by Photograph by Diane Meyer on 'Respublica', submitted by Jim Stettner. Taken on 2011-05-01

This instrument has been viewed 122 times.