Pipe Organ Database

a project of the organ historical society

Wicks Pipe Organ Co. (Opus 1228, 1934)

Location:

St. Alphonsus Liguori R.C. Church
1118 N. Grand Blvd.
St. Louis, MO 63106 US
The Rock Church
Organ ID: 8518

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Status and Condition:

  • This instrument's location type is: Roman Catholic Churches
  • The organ has been renovated with changes from its original state.
  • The organ's condition is unknown.
We received the most recent update for this instrument's status from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.

Technical Details:

  • Chests: Wicks Direct Electric
  • 38 ranks. 4 divisions. 3 manuals. 36 stops. 49 registers.
All:
  • Chest Type(s): Wicks Direct Electric chests
  • Position: Pipes exposed (in whole or in part) in a gallery at the rear of the room.
We received the most recent update for this division from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Main:
  • Manuals: 3
  • Divisions: 4
  • Stops: 36
  • Registers: 49
  • Position: Console in fixed position, center.
  • Manual Compass: 61
  • Pedal Compass: 32
  • Key Action: Electrical connection from key to chest.
  • Console Style: Horseshoe style console.
  • Stop Controls: Stop keys in horseshoe curves.
We received the most recent update for this console from Database Manager on May 13, 2018.
Jeff Scofield on March 17, 2021:

Excerpt from the April 2002 edition of The Diapason:

Wicks Opus 1228 was built in 1934 in the Church of St. Alphonsus Liguori, “The Rock Church”, of St. Louis, Missouri under the direction of John Henry Wick, son of company founder John Wick. This grand instrument served as the genesis for this project. This instrument contains some of the first work done by Henry Vincent Willis for the Wicks firm. Voicing untouched, this instrument has remained “as installed” with the exception of an updated relay in the 1980’s. It was not our intention to use leathered upper lips or strings the size of soda straws, but the over all sound, that grand and glorious sound, was a shoe-in once the music ministry of Christ Church heard it. St. Alphonsus was also used for the concept of the modern façade. Our intention was not to turn back the clock but rather to find the best possible place to stop its pendulum. This concept is long overdue: the return to instruments that inspire players to play them, and inspire the listener to something larger than mere sound or force. The intention was to build an instrument that wanted to be played by a musician as well as a technician, one that promoted improvisation as well as recitation.

We received the most recent update for this note from Jeff Scofield on March 17, 2021.

Database Manager on August 31, 2013:

Updated through online information from Scott Crowell. -- The church caught fire due to a lightning strike in 2007. The organ suffered some smoke and water damage but the horseshoe-style console and much of the casework was able to be salvaged. The organ was restored and refurbished by Wicks in 2008. Also at this time the organ was updated with solid-state equipment, but no tonal changes were made.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on October 30, 2004:

Status Note: There 1997

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Database Manager on October 30, 2004:

Tonal design under Henry Vincent Willis. May be a reference in American Organist 4/1935.

We received the most recent update for this note from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.
Source not recorded: Open In New Tab From The Stopt Diapason Summer 2007
We received the most recent update for this stoplist from Database Manager on April 09, 2020.

Instrument Images:

Organ Case: Photograph by Wicks Organ Co., via Facebook, submitted by Jeff Scofield. Taken on 2012-10-30

Church interior to rear and organ case: Photograph from an archival source: Church Facebook, submitted by Jeff Scofield. Taken on 2017-12-31

Ceiling, stained glass windows, church interior to front: Photograph from an archival source: Church Facebook, submitted by Jeff Scofield. Taken on 2017-11-07

Church exterior: Photograph by Wikimedia, submitted by Jeff Scofield. Taken on 2017-04-13

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